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The complete list of Walter Lantz animated shorts.

ShortsEdit

1929Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Race Riot Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
The first theatrical cartoon released by the Walter Lantz Studio. The first Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon produced by Walter Lantz. The first appearances of Oswald and Pete in a Walter Lantz cartoon. First onscreen credits for Bill Nolan and Tom Palmer at Lantz. The first musical score by Bert Fiske. The copyright synopsis for this cartoon refers to Oswald's horse by the name "Mopey." The titles for the early Lantz Oswalds have an animated Oswald popping out from behind a fence to laugh at the audience. These titles were used until early-1930.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Oil's Well Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
The first appearance of Kitty (Originally Sadie in the Disney shorts) in a Walter Lantz cartoon. Earlier films such as this used specialty closing titles, suiting the cartoon. The soundtrack of this cartoon features the tune Sing a Little Love Song, written by Con Conrad, Sidney D. Mitchell, and Archie Gottler for the 1929 Universal musical Broadway based on the play of the same name by George Abbott and Philip Dunning. Kitty's appearance is different from her other appearances from 1929 and Early-Mid 1930, having lipstick, a black skirt, and a white like body, rather than her white/pink skirt, black body, and no lipstick like in the Disney/Winkler shorts, her appearance would later go back to the Disney/Winkler design in her following appearance, though her lipstick would be used again starting with Not So Quiet.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Permanent Wave Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Cold Turkey Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Lost cartoon. Oswald speaks for the first time. Some online sources claim that Bill Nolan provided Oswald's voice for this cartoon. However, such an assertion cannot be verified, given the fact that written records stating this have yet to surface, that a print (or at least a soundtrack) of this particular film has yet to surface, and that an audio recording of Bill Nolan's voice has yet to surface. If at least the latter two of these three were available, only then, through a comparative audio analysis, could this claim be confirmed either way.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Pussy Willie Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Lost cartoon. First onscreen credit for R. C. Hamilton at Lantz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Amature Nite Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Exists only as a silent print. The first musical score by David Broekman.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Hurdy Gurdy Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Loosely based on the 1928 Disney Oswald Hungry Hoboes. Love Me, and the World Is Mine (written in 1906 by Ernest Ball) is included on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Snow Use Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
The soundtrack of this cartoon features the tunes Winter (written in 1910 by Albert Gumble and Alfred Bryan), Hi-Lee, Hi-Lo, and A Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight (written in 1896 by Theodore August Metz and Joe Hayden).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Nutty Notes Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
An Italian copy of the cartoon exists, The title card was also copyrighted as “The Magic Piano”. (Italian Title : Il Pianoforte Magico)
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Ozzie of the Circus Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Lost cartoon. The final musical score by Bert Fiske, David Broekman would take over until mid-1930. Many sources give this cartoon an erroneous January 5, 1929 release date (therefore citing this as the first Walter Lantz cartoon instead of Race Riot). January 5, however, is actually the short's copyright date. This issue was present in the first two editions of Jeff Lenburg's Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons. In the third edition, it was corrected in the Oswald filmography, but not in the Oswald character description.

1930Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Kounty Fair Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Exists only as a silent print.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Chilly Con Carmen Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Russell Merritt has suggested that the 1929 Silly Symphony El Terrible Toreador may have been based on an unfinished Disney Oswald cartoon. In that case, Chilly Con Carmen may represent the later Oswald staff finishing their version of the short.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Kisses and Kurses Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Lost cartoon. According to copyright synopsis of this film, the villain engineers a train known as The General, likely a reference to the 1926 Buster Keaton feature of the same name.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Broadway Folly Walter Lantz Rollin Hamilton
Bill Nolan
Tom Palmer
Cartoon found in 2010. The soundtrack of this cartoon features the tunes Broadway and Hittin' The Ceiling, both written by Con Conrad, Sidney D. Mitchell, and Archie Gottler for the hit 1929 Universal musical Broadway based on the play of the same name by George Abbott and Philip Dunning. In addition, the following songs can also be heard on the soundtrack: In My Merry Oldsmobile (written in 1905 by Gus Edwards and Vincent P. Bryan), Alexander's Ragtime Band (1911 by Irving Berlin), (You're the Flower of My Heart,) Sweet Adeline (1903 by Richard H. Gerard and Harry Armstrong), Chicago (That Toddlin' Town) (1922 by Fred Fisher), and Hearts and Flowers (1893 by Theodore Moses Tobani and Mary D. Brine).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Bowery Bimbos Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Manuel Moreno
An Italian print of the cartoon exists. The Audio Track also survives. The soundtrack of this cartoon features the tunes Yes! We Have No Bananas (written in 1922 by Frank Silver and Irving Cohn) and Down By The Winegar Woiks. The latter tune, played over the short's opening titles, was written in 1925 by Don Bestor, Roger Lewis and Walter Donovan and famously recorded in 1926 by Aileen Stanley and Billy Murray (the voice of Fleischer's Bimbo character).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Hash Shop Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Manuel Moreno
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Prison Panic Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
The Prisoner's Song (written in 1924 by Guy Massey) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Tramping Tramps Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Manuel Moreno
Walter Lantz's final credit as an animator.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Hot for Hollywood Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Exists as a silent print. Vitaphone disc of the soundtrack was found in 2005. The final musical score by David Broekman, James Dietrich would take over until mid-1937
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Hells Heels Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
The first musical score by James Dietrich. The first Oswald to feature the famous "Boop-Oop-a-Doop" ending tune. This cartoon is a satire of the 1930 Universal feature Hell's Heroes.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit My Pal Paul Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
This cartoon was produced to help promote the 1930 Universal musical King of Jazz and prominently features a caricature of bandleader Paul Whiteman as well as several songs from the film. In addition, Lantz and his staff were commissioned by Carl Laemmle to create an animated color sequence for King of Jazz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Not So Quiet Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Pinto Colvig
This cartoon is a satire of the 1930 Academy Award-winning Universal feature All Quiet on the Western Front. Ironically, the score for that film was provided by former Lantz musical director David Broekman. Kitty's design was slightly modified giving her lipstick that was originally used in Oil's Well, and most of the time stayed having that throughout most of her later appearances.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Spooks Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Pinto Colvig
Pinto Colvig provides the voice of the hippo in this short. This cartoon is a satire of the 1925 Universal feature Phantom of the Opera which was reissued with sound in January 1930.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Cold Feet Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Pinto Colvig
A drawing made by the animators attributed to this short shows Oswald playing a radiator like an accordion. This idea never made it to the final cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Snappy Salesman Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Rollin Hamilton
Tom Palmer
Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Pinto Colvig
It is quite possible that this short was a withheld 1929 entry. It runs for approximately five minutes, which is shorter than the average running time of a Lantz cartoon from this period. One might also note that the short's production number, 5082, is a number that would have been routinely assigned to a 1929 cartoon. Further, some elements of the film, such as Oswald's thoughts being transcribed onscreen, are strongly reminiscent of Lantz productions from 1929 as opposed to those from mid-1930. There is also an abrupt jump cut that occurs approximately three minutes into the short and it is possible that an edit may have taken place here. Specifically, the cut appears during the scene when Oswald first leads the cat family into his music shop. He puts up his index finger as if to address the crowd but, before anything can actually happen, the scene abruptly shifts to the feline family laughing. In addition to this, the cartoon opens with an iris, much like a Lantz release from September or October 1929; but it also closes with a curtain, a technique first introduced in either late October or early November 1929.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Henpecked Walter Lantz Bill Nolan
Ray Abrams
Manuel Moreno
Clyde Geronimi
Pinto Colvig
Pinto Colvig provides the voice of Oswald in this short while Walter Lantz provides the voice of one of his many nephews.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Singing Sap Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
First cartoon co-directed by William "Bill" Nolan. First onscreen credits for Fred "Tex" Avery and Lester Kline. First time James Dietrich is credited under "Musical Score" instead of "Synchronization and Score" This cartoon's title is a play on the 1928 Warner Bros. feature The Singing Fool starring Al Jolson.

Pinto Colvig provides the voice of the hippo in this short.

Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Detective Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation from Amature Nite (1929).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Fowl Ball Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
In this short, Oswald sings the song Johnny Schmoker, a traditional German folk tune brought to America by the Pennsylvania Dutch and first published under the title Jemmy Boker in 1863. The song involves an old German musician telling his friend Johnny Schmoker about the many instruments he can play. He describes each one and goes through the motions while he sings. It is likely that musical director James Dietrich, himself of German ancestry, had an influence on the inclusion of this song in this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Navy Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald wears shoes for the first time. Pinto Colvig provides the voice of Oswald in this short.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Mexico Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Soundtrack found in 2013.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Africa Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation from the Lantz studio's sequence in the 1930 Universal feature King of Jazz. The first appearance of the popular Oswald the Lucky Rabbit theme song.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Alaska Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Pinto Colvig provides the voices of Oswald and Pete in this short as well as the deadpan canine vocalist who sings a rendition of the nonsensical tune Go Get the Ax.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Mars Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation from Africa. The song A Bench in the Park (written in 1930 by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen for Universal's King of Jazz) is featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.

1931Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit China Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The song Chinatown, My Chinatown (written in 1910 by William Jerome and Jean Schwartz) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit College Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The song I Like to Do Things for You (written in 1930 by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen for Universal's King of Jazz) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Shipwreck Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald wears gloves for the first time. The song It Ain't Gonna Rain No Mo' (written in 1923 by Wendell Hall) is featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon. As the parrot is lowered down via fishing line, he greets each of the fish, "Hi Bill, Hi Charlie, Hello Cecil, Howdy Ella!" Bill, Charlie, Cecil, and Ella are actually referring to staff members, William "Bill" Nolan, Charles Hastings, Cecil Surry (an inbetweener at this point), and possibly a woman from the ink and paint department by the name of Ella.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Farmer Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation from Alaska (1930).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Fireman Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation from Amature Nite (1929).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Sunny South Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Country School Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Soundtrack found in 2015.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Bandmaster Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The cartoon fell into the public domain in 1959. Includes reused animation from My Pal Paul (1930). The songs Ragamuffin Romeo (written by Mabel Wayne and Harry DeCosta) and Happy Feet (written by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen) are featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon. Both were written in 1930 for Universal's King of Jazz and both appear in this short in sequences that were more-or-less reused from My Pal Paul (1930).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Northwoods Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Stone Age Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Radio Rhythm Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The soundtrack of this cartoon features the tunes I Like to Do Things for You (written in 1930 by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen for Universal's King of Jazz), And If You See Our Darling Nellie (also written in 1930 for King of Jazz), and One More Time (written in 1931 by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown, and Ray Henderson).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Kentucky Belles Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation of the crowd scenes from Radio Rhythm (1931).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Hot Feet Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The final onscreen for Chet Karrberg at Lantz. The animator suddenly died at the age of 21 due to pneumonia. He was replaced by Vet Anderson from New York, best known for his work on Paul Terry's "Aesop's Fables" series in the 1920s. Kitty's appearance was once again modified giving her a yellow curly wig like hair, which she would have this until Carnival Capers (1932), though she wouldn't have the hair and looking more like her design before this cartoon in The Hunter, and The Winged Horse (1932).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Hunter Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald wears a shirt for the first time. First animation credit for Vet Anderson at Lantz. The poster seen here seems to demonstrate a very different plot.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Wonderland Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Last screen credits for Pinto Colvig and Clyde Geronimi at Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Hare Mail Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Mickey Rooney provides the voice of Oswald in this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Fisherman Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Title cards been found in 2015. Mickey Rooney provides the voice of Oswald in this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Clown Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Includes reused animation of the crowd scenes from Radio Rhythm (1931).

1932Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Grandma's Pet Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Mechanical Man Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Fell into the public domain in 1960.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Wins Out Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Beau and Arrows Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Making Good Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Fell into the public domain in 1960. First onscreen credit for Bill Weber.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Let's Eat Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Winged Horse Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
First animation credit for Bunny Ellison.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Cat Nipped Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit A Wet Knight Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
The song Music Hath Charms (written in 1930 by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen for Universal's King of Jazz) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit A Jungle Jumble Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Walter Lantz
Bill Nolan
Last onscreen credit for Bunny Ellison. Includes reused animation from Cat Nipped.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Day Nurse Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Starting around this period in 1932, Lantz and Nolan split into two separate units. Despite the fact that Lantz and Nolan are still credited as co-directors on the Oswald series, these units are easily differentiated. Those shorts listing animators Ray Abrams or Tex Avery first were directed by Bill Nolan. Those with Manuel Moreno and Lester Kline were directed by Lantz. First onscreen credit for Jack Carr.
Pooch the Pup The Athlete Walter Lantz Walter Lantz The First Cartoon of The Pooch the Pup series. Obviously a spoof of the 1932 Summer Olympics held in Los Angeles, California. All of the Pooch cartoons were directed by Lantz only, despite the fact that many books claim that Lantz and Nolan worked as a directing team on this series
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Busy Barber Bill Nolan Bill Nolan A remake of the silent 1929 Oswald cartoon Yanky Clippers.
Pooch the Pup The Butcher Boy Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Carnival Capers Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Starting with this cartoon, Kitty's design was completely changed from a cat to a beagle (which the design was used for Pooch the Pup's girlfriend, but the only difference with the two female characters being that they have different clothes. Her design would be like this throughout 1933.
Pooch the Pup The Crowd Snores Walter Lantz Walter Lantz This cartoon is a satire of the 1932 Warner Bros. feature The Crowd Roars starring James Cagney and Joan Blondell.
Pooch The Pup The Under Dog Walter Lantz Walter Lantz The first Pooch short to use the "Kingdom Coming" opening. The song A Great Big Bunch of You (written in 1932 by Harry Warren and Mort Dixon) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Wild and Woolly Bill Nolan Bill Nolan
Pooch The Pup Cats and Dogs Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Teacher's Pests Bill Nolan Bill Nolan

1933Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Pooch the Pup Merry Dog Walter Lantz Walter Lantz First onscreen credit for Fred Kopietz.
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit The Plumber Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Fell into the public domain in 1961. First onscreen credit for Don Williams. The song It Ain't Gonna Rain No Mo' (written in 1923 by Wendell Hall) is featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Pooch The Pup The Terrible Troubadour Walter Lantz Walter Lantz The Mills Brothers make an appearance singing Hold That Bull (a take-off on Hold That Tiger). The song Lady of Spain (written in 1931 by Robert Hargreaves, Tolchard Evans, Stanley J. Damerell, and Henry Tilsley) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Shriek Bill Nolan Bill Nolan The cartoon is a parody of The Shiek, a 1921 Paramount film. First onscreen credit for Cecil Surry.
Pooch The Pup The Lumber Champ Walter Lantz Walter Lantz The song The Cute Little Things You Do (written in 1931 by J.F. Hanley) is prominently featured on the soundtrack of this cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Going to Blazes Bill Nolan Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Beau Best Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Includes reused animation from Africa, Alaska, The Singing Sap, and Mars (all 1930). The snake charmer is actually a caricature of Mahatma Gandhi. This cartoon's title is a play on the 1926 Paramount feature Beau Geste, based on the 1924 adventure novel of the same name by P. C. Wren.
Pooch The Pup Nature's Workshop Walter Lantz Walter Lantz First onscreen credit for Ernest Smythe at Lantz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Ham and Eggs Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Last onscreen credit for Don Williams.
Pooch The Pup Pin Feathers Walter Lantz Walter Lantz Pooch's appearance in this film (as well as the others to follow with the exception of Hot and Cold) is much more different than in previous ones. His new design is strikingly similar to Fleischer's Bimbo.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Confidence Bill Nolan Bill Nolan President Franklin D. Roosevelt is caricatured.
Pooch The Pup Hot and Cold Walter Lantz Walter Lantz This short prominently features the song Turn on the Heat from the 1929 Fox musical comedy Sunnyside Up featuring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. The final appearance of Pooch The Pup with the original design.
Pooch The Pup King Klunk Walter Lantz Walter Lantz This cartoon is an obvious satire of the 1933 RKO feature King Kong.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Five and Dime Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Includes reused animation from Ham and Eggs. Caricatures include Jimmy Durante, Charlie Chaplin, and Laurel and Hardy. The first cartoon to use the Warner-esque Oswald-zooming-in opening titles, while previous Lantz Oswald releases used an opening title with some variation of the rabbit appearing from behind a fence. This short prominently features the song I Found a Million Dollar Baby (in a Five and Ten Cent Store) originally sung in 1931 by Fanny Brice and later popularized by Bing Crosby and the Boswell Sisters in separate recordings. It should also be noted that Ragamuffin Romeo (written in 1930 by Mabel Wayne and Harry DeCosta for Universal's King of Jazz) is played over this cartoon's opening titles.
Pooch The Pup She Done Him Right Walter Lantz Walter Lantz The Final Pooch the Pup cartoon. This cartoon is a satire of the 1933 Universal feature She Done Him Wrong starring Mae West. First onscreen credit for George Grandpre. Grandpre replaced Charles Hastings who left shortly after blinding Tex Avery in the left eye with a rubber-band powered paper clip. A frequent player in the 1933-35 Lantz cartoons, Dopey Dick, makes his first appearance here. Dopey looks and acts strikingly similiar to that of Wimpy from the Fleischer Studios' Popeye series. The soundtrack of this cartoon features the songs And If You See Our Darling Nellie (written in 1930 for Universal's King of Jazz) and Minnie the Moocher's Wedding Day (written in 1932 by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler for Cab Calloway). Since the Pooch series would be discontinued, Lantz returned to directing Oswalds, but still soley directing them as well as Nolan. Avery and Jack Carr soon started doubling up as gagmen for Nolan, and Avery started functioning as something of a co-director (ditto for Manuel Moreno working with Lantz). Interestingly, the next two Lantz-directed Oswalds released (The Merry Old Soul in 1933 and Chicken Reel in 1934) both have the rabbit sporting a Pooch-like sweater as opposed to his usual white-collar shirt. It could be that both were initially planned as Pooch the Pup cartoons.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Zoo Bill Nolan Bill Nolan The Zoo is most notable for Tex Avery's gag involving moths who chew up a bear's fur coat. When the bear is left in his underwear, he turns to the audience and, instead of running away or blushing, says "Well, imagine that!"
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Merry Old Soul Walter Lantz Walter Lantz Academy Award nominee There is a cameo appearance by Laverne Harding's comic-strip character Cynical Susie. They're caricatures include Charlie Chaplin, Greta Garbo, Ed Wynn, Laurel and Hardy, Joe E. Brown, Will Rogers, Paul Whiteman, Roscoe Ates, Edna Mae Oliver, W.C. Fields, Al Jolson, Mae West, Jimmy Durante, Harold Lloyd, Zasu Pitts, and all four Marx Brothers.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Parking Space Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Kitty's design was changed once again making most of her white skin more black here, afterwards, she would have this design once again in King's Up (1934), then afterwards, her design would changed over and over with her next appearance all the way until her final appearance in 1935.

1934Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Chicken Reel Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Candy House Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The County Fair Bill Nolan Bill Nolan First onscreen credit for George Merle Gilson.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Toy Shoppe Walter Lantz Walter Lantz In 1984, Fred Ladd and Entercolor Technologies Corp. colorized this cartoon as a test for Universal. The studio rejected this and all future plans for colorizing black and white Lantz cartoons.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Kings Up Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Last cartoon to credit Walter Lantz and Bill Nolan as co-directors, despite them directing cartoons by theirselves starting with Day Nurse (1932). Many copies of this cartoon have the Jolson blackface gag omitted.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Wolf! Wolf! Walter Lantz Walter Lantz First Oswald cartoon since 1930 to feature a sole director's credit for Walter Lantz.

Victor McLeod, Lantz storyman and animator for several years to come, gets his first onscreen credit. First animation credit for female veteran Lantz animator, Laverne Harding, here credited as Verne.

Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Ginger Bread Boy Tex Avery (uncredited) Tex Avery (uncredited) The story within the cartoon is based on "The Gingerbread Man," a fairy tale published in 1875. No credit is given for the director of this cartoon. While judging from the animators listed, one would tend to think this is a Nolan effort. The big question, however, is why would he leave his name off of the film? One might speculate that the director is in fact Tex Avery, since Avery's name is now listed in front of Ray Abrams in the animation credits, while traditionally, Avery's name would follow Abrams.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Goldielocks and the Three Bears Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Annie Moved Away Bill Nolan Bill Nolan First cartoon to feature a sole director's credit for Bill Nolan. Includes reused animation from Five and Dime (1933). Starting here, the design for Kitty would change every time she made an appearance now and then until her final appearance in 1935.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Wax Works Walter Lantz Walter Lantz This short prominently features caricatures of the monsters from Universal's famous horror films, including the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Dracula, Frankenstein, the Mummy, and the Invisible Man. Mr. Hyde of Paramount's 1931 feature Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (based on the Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) is also featured as well as Bluebeard from Georges Méliès' 1902 film of the same name (based on the folktale by Charles Perrault).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit William Tell Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Last onscreen credit for George Merle Gilson until his return in 1938.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Chris Columbus, Jr. Walter Lantz Walter Lantz First onscreen credit for Joe d'Igalo. This cartoon is notable for a gag that Tex Avery came up with and animated on the spot. It involves the villian getting his peg leg stuck in a lit cannon! The film depicts Oswald/Columbus having an audience with a young Isabella I of Castile and a very elderly Ferdinand II of Aragon. However, the real Isabella (1451-1504) and Ferdinand (1452-1516) were around the same age with Isabella actually being an entire year older than Ferdinand! The Guild/Firelight reissue of this cartoon omits the scene where Isabella shouts "Bon Voyage" to Oswald/Columbus and then accidentally breaks a bottle of wine against the head of Dopey Dick as opposed to the bow of the ship. Dopey subsequently licks the wine off of his face and then hiccups.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Dizzy Dwarf Bill Nolan Bill Nolan
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Ye Happy Pilgrims Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Cartune Classic Jolly Little Elves Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Academy Award nominee. The first full-length Walter Lantz cartoon in color. The first one-shot Walter Lantz cartoon. Jolly Little Elves was made in two-color Technicolor, as were the subsequent Lantz Cartune Classics released during 1934 and 1935.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Sky Larks Tex Avery (uncredited) Tex Avery (uncredited) The live-action clip from the Universal Newspaper Newsreel shows professor Auguste Piccard, a Swiss scientist who was able to go higher than anyone ever before in a diving bell-like vessel carried by a balloon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Spring in the Park Bill Nolan Bill Nolan Last onscreen credit for Bill Nolan at Lantz. Nolan would leave the studio in 1934 and briefly find work as head animator on a series of shorts based on the Skippy comic strip before going to work at the Charles Mintz studio and later Felischer studios in Miami. The final appearance of Pete in a Lantz cartoon until 1937.
Cartune Classic Toyland Premiere Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Features Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Includes reused animation from Merry Dog (1933). Caricatures include Bing Crosby, Eddie Cantor (in blackface), Frankenstein, Laurel and Hardy, Shirley Temple, and Johnny Weissmuller among others.

1935Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Robinson Crusoe Isle Tex Avery (uncredited) Tex Avery (uncredited) Includes reused animation from Shipwreck (1931). Walter Lantz provides the voice of the mountain in this short.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Hillbilly Tex Avery (uncredited) Tex Avery (uncredited) The final appearance of Oswald's girlfriend Kitty. Last onscreen credits for Jack Carr, Joe d'Igalo, and Ernest Smythe at Lantz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Two Little Lambs Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Do a Good Deed Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Cartune Classic Candy Land Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Elmer the Great Dane Tex Avery (uncredited) Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The first appearance of Oswald's dog, Elmer the Great Dane. Elmer became a frequent player in most of the Oswalds for the next three years.
Cartune Classic Springtime Serenade Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Features Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Lyrics by Walter Lantz. This opening title of this cartoons refers to Oswald as simply "Oswald Rabbit" as opposed to "Oswald the Lucky Rabbit". Following this release, the full name would continue to be applied to both the character and the series until Doctor Oswald (released on December 20) when the adjective "lucky" was permanently dropped.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Town Hall Follies Tex Avery (uncredited) Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The storyline was reworked by Avery ten years later in MGM's Wild and Woolfy (this time set in the Wild West) featuring Droopy. Last onscreen credit for Fred "Tex" Avery at Lantz until 1954.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit At Your Service Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
First and only onscreen credits for Virgil Ross and Sid Sutherland at Lantz
Cartune Classic Three Lazy Mice Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Bronco Buster Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
First onscreen credit for Bill Mason.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Amateur Broadcast Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Last onscreen credit for Cecil Surry at Lantz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Quail Hunt Tex Avery (uncredited) Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Fell into the public domain in 1963. Historian Joe Adamson speculates this short to be an uncredited Tex Avery-directed effort.
Cartune Classic Fox and the Rabbit Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The Final Cartune Classic short. The teacher's dialogue, "Go home! Go to bed! Scram!" is muted out of this short's reissue print.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Monkey Wretches Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The final appearance of Oswald in his original design, the first appearance of Meany, Miny and Moe (who were supporting characters). their popularity led to their development into a series of their own for Universal.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Case of the Lost Sheep Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The first cartoon to feature the white Oswald, a concept by Manuel Moreno. Despite retaining the name, this later version of Oswald looks like a completely different character.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Doctor Oswald Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
From this point onward, the character is referred to as "Oswald Rabbit" instead of "Oswald the Lucky Rabbit" in the title cards.

1936Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Soft Ball Game Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The production process of this cartoon is featured in Cartoonland Mysteries, the eighteenth installment of Universal's Going Places documentary series narrated by Lowell Thomas and directed by Charles E. Ford.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Alaska Sweepstakes Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Slumberland Express Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Beauty Shoppe Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The second appearance of Meany, Miny and Moe (still not differentiated). Includes reused animation from Monkey Wretches (1935).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Barnyard Five Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
First appearance of the ducklings Fee, Fi, Fo, Fum, and Phooey.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Fun House Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Farming Fools Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The third appearance of Meany, Miny and Moe (still not differentiated)
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Battle Royal Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The final appearance of Dopey Dick. The fourth appearance of Meany, Miny and Moe (still not differentiated)
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Music Hath Charms Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Kiddie Revue Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Beach Combers Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Fell into the public domain in 1964.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Night Life of the Bugs Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
First onscreen credits for Dick Bickenbach and Jack Dunham. This cartoon's title is a play on the 1935 Universal comedy Night Life of the Gods. Freddie and Ginger Centipede (an obvious spoof of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers) dance to the tune The Lady in Red (written in 1935 by Mort Dixon and Allie Wrubel).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Puppet Show Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Almost the entire film is comprised of live action footage of puppets with only a small bit of animation by Manuel Moreno.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Unpopular Mechanic Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Includes reused animation from The Barnyard Five.
Meany, Miny, and Moe Turkey Dinner Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The First Meany, Miny, and Moe cartoon. Retired Lantz cartoon star Dopey Dick makes a cameo appearance at the end of this cartoon as the hamburger vendor.

The swing hit Sing Sing Sing (With A Swing) (written in 1936 by Louis Prima) is included on the soundtrack of this cartoon.

Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Gopher Trouble Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Meany, Miny, and Moe Knights for a Day Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod

1937Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Meany, Miny, and Moe The Golfers Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Many prints of this cartoon have the gag involving the African-American caricature omitted.
Meany, Miny, and Moe House of Magic Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Fell into the public domain in 1965.
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Everybody Sing Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The first Oswald cartoon to feature the more streamlined, slimmer variation of Manuel Moreno's Oswald. Beginning in 1937, Lantz began to try alternative musical directors to James Dietrich. Lantz would use George Lessner, Nathaniel Shilkret, and song writing duo, Irving Actman and Frank Loesser.
Meany, Miny, and Moe The Big Race Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Includes reused animation from The Crowd Snores (1932).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Duck Hunt Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Meany, Miny and Moe The Lumber Camp Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Birthday Party Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
This cartoon celebrates the 10th anniversary of Oswald.
Meany, Miny and Moe The Steel Workers Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Pete, who previous appeared in Spring in the Park (1934) in a Lantz short, returns in this cartoon as the rival to Meany, Miny, and Moe, he would appear one more time in a Meany, Miny, and Moe cartoon in the same year with The Stevedores.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Trailer Thrills Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Meany, Miny, and Moe The Stevedores Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The final appearance of Pete in a Lantz cartoon.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Wily Weasel Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The first appearance of Doxie Dachshund.
Meany, Miny, and Moe The Country Store Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Includes reused animation from Gopher Trouble (1936).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Playful Pup Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Cartoon found in 2017.
Meany, Miny and Moe Fireman's Picnic Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Cameos by Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and Elmer the Great Dane at the beginning of this one. Many prints of this cartoon have the ending with the drunk giraffe omitted.
Meany, Miny and Moe The Rest Resort Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Last onscreen credit for Manuel Moreno at Lantz
Meany, Miny and Moe Ostrich Feathers Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Last onscreen credit for Ray Abrams at Lantz
Meany, Miny and Moe The Air Express Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The Final Meany, Miny, and Moe cartoon. The final musical score by James Dietrich for Lantz
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Lovesick Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
Win Smith
Win Smith (noted for his work on the early Mickey Mouse comics) gets his first onscreen credit at Lantz.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Keeper of the Lions Walter Lantz Charles Bowers The first appearance of The Dumb Cluck.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Mechanical Handy Man Walter Lantz Charles Bowers Animation pioneer Charles Bowers joined the Lantz staff in 1937 as a storyman. To streamline the product of the films, Bowers created a new character, the Dumb Cluck. This cartoon marks the first appearance of Oswald's short-lived costar.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Football Fever Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Mysterious Jug Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
James Miele
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit The Dumb Cluck Walter Lantz Walter Lantz
Victor McLeod
The cartoon mainly focuses on the character, The Dumb Cluck.

1938Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit The Lamp Lighter Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
James Miele
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Man Hunt Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
James Miele
The first Lantz cartoon to feature voice characterizations by Mel Blanc. First musical score by Frank Marsales for Lantz. For now, Lantz would experiment between Marsales and Frank Churchill.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Yokel Boy Makes Good Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
Win Smith
The First appearance of Snuffy Skunk, The final appearance of The Dumb Cluck. Snuffy attempts to disguise himself as Joe Penner and Martha Raye in order to get into the theatre.
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Trade Mice Walter Lantz Victor McLeod
Win Smith
The final theatrical short directed by Walter Lantz until Crazy House (1940).
Oswald The Lucky Rabbit Feed the Kitty Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The final cartoon in the Oswald series. Oswald appears in two further shorts, Happy Scouts and The Egg Cracker Suite.

Alex Lovy's directorial debut.

New Universal Nellie the Sewing Machine Girl (or Honest Hearts & Willing Hands) Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The first New Universal Cartoon. The name of this series did not derive from the fact that the shorts were new Walter Lantz productions, but rather because Universal, under the immediate post-Carl Laemmle management, attempted to refashion itself as the "New Universal" in order to distance itself from the "Old Universal" (i.e., that of Laemmle and his family). The name "New Universal" was applied to most of Universal's output from 1936 into 1940. The first of many 1890's melodrama lampoons produced by the Lantz studio during 1938 and 1939.
New Universal Tail End Lester Kline Victor McLeod
Win Smith
Features Elmer and Doxie Dachshund. Lester Kline's directorial debut.
New Universal Problem Child Rudy Zamora Victor McLeod
James Miele
Features Elmer The Great Dane. Rudy Zamora's directorial debut. First onscreen credit for George Merle Gilson at Lantz since 1934.
New Universal Movie Phoney News Alex Lovy
Walter Lantz
Tex Avery
Victor McLeod
Win Smith
Walter Lantz
Tex Avery
This "cheater" cartoon features no new animated segments and, with the exception of the soundtrack and the newsreel-esque intertitles, is comprised entirely of footage from the following Lantz releases: The Hillbilly (1935), Monkey Wretches (1935), Soft Ball Game (1936), Alaska Sweepstakes (1936), The Barnyard Five (1936), Music Hath Charms (1936), House of Magic (1937), and The Big Race (1937).
New Universal Nellie the Indian Chief's Daughter Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
Win Smith
New Universal Happy Scouts Fred Kopietz Victor McLeod
James Miele
Fred Kopietz's directorial debut. This cartoon features a new design of Oswald. His fur is now colored and his pants are held up by a single suspender. This design was also used for the character in his cameo appearance in Snuffy's Party (1939) and in his final cartoon, The Egg-Cracker Suite (1943). Oswald would also make two more appearances in two Woody Woodpecker shorts as cameos, Well Oiled (1947) and The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951).
New Universal Cheese-Nappers Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The First Appearance of Baby-Face Mouse.
New Universal Voodoo in Harlem Rudy Zamora Victor McLeod
Win Smith
New Universal Silly Seals Lester Kline Victor McLeod
James Miele
New Universal Barnyard Romeo Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
New Universal Queen's Kittens Lester Kline Victor McLeod
James Miele
New Universal The Big Cat and the Little Mousie Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
Features Baby-Face Mouse.
New Universal Ghost Town Frolics Lester Kline Victor McLeod The first appearances of Jock and Jill, the Simple Simeons. Jock would appear alone in two more shorts: The Rabbit Hunt (1938) and Soup to Mutts (1939). "Simians" is really misspelled as it pertains to the characters' names.
New Universal Pixie Land Elmer Perkins Victor McLeod Elmer Perkins' directorial debut
New Universal The Cat and the Bell Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
Hicks Lokey
Features Baby-Face Mouse.
New Universal Hollywood Bowl Elmer Perkins Victor McLeod
Alex Lovy
The Final Cartoon of the New Universal Cartoons. The final musical score by Frank Churchill. Among the stars seen in this cartoon are Leopold Stokowski, Hugh Herbert, Greta Garbo, Groucho Marx, Bing Crosby (and his horses), Charlie McCharthy, W.C. Fields, Joe Penner (who is given the cold shoulder by Edna Mae Oliver), Ned Sparks, Clark Gable, Charles Laughton, Joe E. Brown, Katherine Hepburn, Ben Bernie, Fats Waller, Rudy Vallee, Martha Raye, Benny Goodman, Cab Calloway, Fred Astaire, and Jack Benny.
Cartune Comedy The Rabbit Hunt Lester Kline Victor McLeod
James Miele
The First Cartune Comedy. Features Jock.
Cartune Comedy Sailor Mouse Alex Lovy Victor McLeod Features Baby-Face Mouse.
Cartune Comedy The Disobedient Mouse Lester Kline Victor McLeod The Final Cartoon Comedy. Features Baby-Face Mouse.
Cartune short Baby Kittens Alex Lovy Victor McLeod The First Cartune Short.
Cartune short Little Blue Blackbird Patrick Lenihan Victor McLeod Patrick Lenihan's directorial debut. Frank Marsales would now become Lantz's permanent musical director until 1941 when Darrell Calker would take over.

1939Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Cartune Short Soup to Mutts Lester Kline Victor McLeod The Final Appearances of Jock and Doxie. Elmer wouldn't appear in another theatrical cartoon until Wrestling Wrecks (1953). Elmer would also later appear in the TV special, Spook-A-Nanny (1965).
Cartune Short I'm Just a Jitterbug Alex Lovy Victor McLeod Final onscreen credit for George Merle Gilson at Lantz. In this cartoon there is a sketch of Baby-Face Mouse in the background of this cartoon.
Nertsery Rhyme The Magic Beans Lester Kline Victor McLeod The first Nertsery Rhyme cartoon. Features Baby-Face Mouse as Beanie.
Cartune Short The Birth of a Toothpick Burt Gillett Victor McLeod Burt Gillett's directorial debut at Lantz
Cartune Short Little Tough Mice Alex Lovy Victor McLeod Features Baby-Face Mouse.
Cartune Short The One-Armed Bandit Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
Cartune Short Crackpot Cruise Alex Lovy Cal Howard Walter Lantz provides the voice of one of the two Italian venders in this short.
Cartune Short Charlie Cuckoo Elmer Perkins Elviry Perkins Obviously, all the credits listed (with the exception of the director) are gag credits
Mello-Drama Nellie of the Circus Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
First Mello-Drama cartoon.
Crackpot Cruise Bolo-Mola Land Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The First Crackpot Cruise cartoon.
Mello-Drama The Bird on Nellie's Hat Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The Final Mello-Drama cartoon.
Lil' Eightball The Stubborn Mule Burt Gillett (uncredited) Kin Platt (uncredited)
Gil Burton (uncredited)
The First Lil' Eightball cartoon. The First Appearance of Lil' Eightball.
Cartune Short Arabs with Dirty Fezzes Alex Lovy Victor McLeod
James Miele
The Final Appearance of Baby-Face Mouse. This cartoon's title is a play on the 1938 Warner Bros. feature Angels with Dirty Faces directed by Michael Curtiz and starring James Cagney.
Cartune Short Snuffy's Party Elmer Perkins Victor McLeod
Hicks Lokey
The first appearance of Mr. Whippletree. Oswald the Lucky Rabbit makes a cameo in this cartoon. Includes reused animation from Kiddie Revue (1936) and Yokel Boy Makes Good (1938).
Crackpot Cruise Slaphappy Valley Alex Lovy Victor McLeod The Final Crackpot Cruise Cartoon. The first appearance of Punchy.
Lil' Eightball Silly Superstition Burt Gillett (uncredited) Kin Platt (uncredited)
Gil Burton (uncredited)
Fell into the public domain in 1967. The final Lil' Eightball cartoon. Lil' Eightball would appear in one more cartoon known as A Haunting We Will Go. The last Walter Lantz cartoon filmed in black and white.
Cartune Short A Haunting We Will Go Burt Gillett Kin Platt
Gil Burton
The first Walter Lantz cartoon made in three-strip Technicolor. From this point onward, all of the Walter Lantz cartoons would be produced in color. The final appearance of Lil' Eightball.
Andy Panda Life Begins for Andy Panda Alex Lovy (uncredited) Victor McLeod (uncredited) The first appearance of Andy Panda and the first cartoon in the Andy Panda series. Includes reused animation from Snuffy's Party.
Peterkin Scrambled Eggs Alex Lovy Elaine Pogany The first and only Peterkin cartoon.
Nertsery Rhyme The Sleeping Princess Burt Gillett Kin Platt
Gil Burton
The Final Nertsery Rhyme.

1940Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Andy Panda Andy Panda Goes Fishing Burt Gillett
Alex Lovy
Victor McLeod
Gil Burton
Includes reused animation from Life Begins for Andy Panda (1939). The opening credits feature an unusual theme song. The vocal version was used only once for this cartoon while instrumental versions would play over the opening titles of 100 Pygmies and Andy Panda (released in April) and Crazy House (released in September).

Andy refers to the turtle (who talks like Jack Benny's valet, Eddie Rochester) as "Mr. Whippletree." Model sheets refer to him simply as "Rochester Turtle" while Nat Falk's 1941 book How To Make Animated Cartoons features an illustration of the character labeled "Winchester Turtle." The 1940 children's book adaptation of 1939's Life Begins for Andy Panda by Paul T. Gilbert also refers to the character as "Winchester Turtle."

Cartune Short Kittens' Mittens Alex Lovy Victor McLeod Last onscreen credit for Victor McLeod.
Cartune Short Adventures of Tom Thumb Jr. Burt Gillett Victor McLeod (uncredited)
Gil Burton (uncredited)
Last onscreen credit for Burt Gillett at Lantz.
Andy Panda 100 Pygmies and Andy Panda Alex Lovy Victor McLeod (uncredited) The final appearance of Mr. Whippletree. Includes reused animation from Life Begins for Andy Panda (1939).
Andy Panda Crazy House Walter Lantz (uncredited) Victor McLeod (uncredited) The first Andy Panda cartoon to have no involvement with the Panda Hunters at all. The first cartoon to be directed by Walter Lantz since Barnyard Romeo (1938), however he would mostly be uncredited throughout most of his directing career starting with this cartoon.
Cartune Short Recruiting Daze Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
Features Punchy. First onscreen credits for Ben Hardaway and Lowell Elliot at Lantz
Andy Panda Knock Knock Alex Lovy (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The first appearance of Woody Woodpecker, he would have his own series the following year. The final musical score by Frank Marsales at Lantz.
Cartune Short Syncopated Sioux Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
Features Punchy. No credit is given to the musical director of this cartoon. One would tend to think that Frank Marsales would have done it, but it is also possible (and very likely) that Darrell Calker could have as well. Calker would take over Marsales' place starting in 1941.

1941Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Andy Panda Mouse Trappers Alex Lovy (uncredited) Ben Hardaway The first musical score by Darrell Calker. Poppa Panda's voiced changed, now he sounds like W.C Fields. Most copies of this cartoon are missing the drinking scene featuring the mouse and the cat. Also missing in many prints is the scene that takes place after Poppa Panda tries to shoot an apple off of the mouse's head. Poppa is such a bad shot, that the mouse hands him a card reading "You Are Exempt from Military Service" (obviously a reference to FDR's peacetime conscription).
Cartune Short Fair Today Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Cartune Short Scrub Me Mama with a Boogie Beat Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway Fell into the public domain in 1969. This cartoon has been withheld from distribution by Universal since 1949 due to its portrayal of African-Americans. The decision was made after a strong objection was raised by the NAACP upon the short's reissue in 1948. The entire episode was a shock to Lantz who prided himself on avoiding problems with the censors. He repeatedly stated that his cartoons were never meant to offend anyone. After the 1948 decision, Lantz made a major effort to make sure that offensive caricatures of any racial or ethnic group would never appear in his cartoons again. He also personally made sure that Scrub Me Mama would never be distributed on television.
Catune Short Hysterical Highspots in American History Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Andy Panda Dizzy Kitty Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Cartune Short Salt Water Daffy Walter Lantz Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The final appearance of Punchy.
Woody Woodpecker Woody Woodpecker Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The first cartoon of the Woody Woodpecker series. The 2nd appearance of Woody Woodpecker.
Cartune Short Andy Panda's Pop Alex Lovy (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
By this time, Poppa Panda had become such a success that Lantz decided to have him star in his own cartoon. It should be noted that Andy Panda himself does not appear here at all. Andy's mother does make a cameo appearance, however.
Woody Woodpecker The Screwdriver Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
J. Cosgrove
The final appearance of Mel Blanc as the voice of Woody Woodpecker. Danny Webb would provide the voice for the character in Pantry Panic and The Hollywood Matador before being replaced by Kent Rogers. Blanc's famous Woody laugh would continue to be utilized until 1951, while his "Guess Who?" would be used until the end of the series in 1972.
Cartune Short Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company "B" Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Verne Harding
Includes reused animation from Scrub Me Mama With a Boogie Beat.
Cartune Short Man's Best Friend Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
J. Cosgriff
Pinto Colvig, who previously worked for Lantz as an inbetweener and animator in the studio's days of infancy, returned to voice the hunter in this cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Pantry Panic Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
Fell into the public domain in 1969. Model sheets for this cartoon refer to the cat as "Korny Kat". The first time that Danny Webb provides the voice of Woody. The only Woody Woodpecker cartoon to fall into the public domain.
Swing Simphony $21 a Day (Once a Month) Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The first Swing Simphony cartoon, this short has cameos of Woody Woodpecker, Andy Panda, and Snuffy Skunk. This would be Snuffy's final appearance.

1942Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Andy Panda Under the Spreading Blacksmith Shop Alex Lovy (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The final appearance of Poppa Panda.
Woody Woodpecker The Hollywood Matador Alex Lovy (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
The 2nd and final time Woody Woodpecker is voiced by Danny Webb. A New York Times article dated July 5, 1944 states that "The Motion Picture Society for the Americas convinced Lantz that the title of this cartoon should be changed to "The Hollywood Matador" and that he should refilm 200 of the 600 feet in the short to eliminate a number of Mexicans shown without shoes and another comic Mexican shown sleeping blissfully with a sombrero over his face. The fear was that Mexican audiences would resent the implications of national laziness."
Swing Simphony The Hams That Couldn't Be Cured Walter Lantz Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
Cartune Short Mother Goose on the Loose Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway
Lowell Elliot
Andy Panda Good-Bye Mr. Moth Walter Lantz Ben Hardaway
Chuck Couch
The final cartoon to be directed by Walter Lantz until 1951, this is also the last time Walter Lantz is credited as a director. The first Solo-Andy Panda cartoon. This cartoon's title is a play on the 1939 MGM feature Goodbye, Mr. Chips starring Robert Donat and Greer Garson. One of the tags Andy reads is signed "Bernie Kreisler". Kreisler was the head of the Universal short subjects sales department at the time. Lantz had quickly inserted the name as a joke. When Kreisler found out he demanded Lantz to take his name off. Lantz replied, "Well, Bernie, I'm sorry I can't take it off. Universal made three hundred fifty prints of it, we can't just make all new prints." The name stayed, but Kreisler was not happy about it at all.
Andy Panda Nutty Pine Cabin Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Chuck Couch
The first time Andy Panda is an adult.
Woody Woodpecker Ace in the Hole Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The first time Kent Rogers provides the voice of Woody. First onscreen credit for Milt Schaffer at Lantz.
Swing Symphony Juke Box Jamboree Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Chuck Couch
Academy Award nominee.
Cartune Short Pigeon Patrol Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The final Cartune short. The first appearance of Homer Pigeon. Most prints of this cartoon are missing several scenes involving the Japanese vulture as well as Homer's "kick in the Axis for Hitler" line.
Andy Panda Andy Panda's Victory Garden Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The first appearance of Charlie Chicken. Charlie would make his second and final appearance in Meatless Tuesday (1943). After his screen career, Charlie became a prominent player in comic books (usually paired with Andy Panda).
Swing Symphony Yankee Doodle Swing Shift Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Woody Woodpecker The Loan Stranger Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Woody is voiced by Kent Rogers in this cartoon, despite the reused Mel Blanc audio from Woody Woodpecker (1941) heard in the beginning.
Swing Symphony Boogie Woogie Sioux Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Andy Panda Air Raid Warden Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The original end title card features a plug for war bonds.

1943Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Swing Simphony Cow-Cow Boogie Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Woody Woodpecker The Screwball Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Swing Symphony The Egg Cracker Suite Ben Hardaway
Emery Hawkins
Milt Schaffer The final official appearance of Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. He would appear as a cameo in Well Oiled (1947) and The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951). First onscreen credit for Emery Hawkins at Lantz. The only Lantz short co-directed by Ben Hardaway. Emery Hawkins would later co-direct Ration Bored (released in June) with Milt Schaffer.
Swing Symphony Swing Your Partner Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The final appearance of Homer Pigeon until 1956. First onscreen credit for Paul J. Smith at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker The Dizzy Acrobat Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Andy Panda Canine Commandos Alex Lovy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The final cartoon to be directed by Alex Lovy at Lantz until 1955.
Woody Woodpecker Ration Bored Emery Hawkins
Milt Schaffer
Ben Hardaway The first time Woody wears gloves. The final time Kent Rogers voices Woody. This is the last appearance of Early Woody Woodpecker, this also the few episodes that Woody dies in the End. The original end title card features a plug for war bonds. Last onscreen credit for Alex Lovy at Lantz until his return to the studio in 1955. The only Lantz short co-directed by Milt Schaffer and the second and final short co-directed by Emery Hawkins.
Swing Symphony Pass the Biscuits Mirandy! James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
James Culhane's directorial debut at Lantz.
Swing Symphony Boogie Woogie Man (Will Get You If You Don't Watch Out) James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Andy Panda Meatless Tuesday James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The final official appearance of Charlie Chicken, he would later appear in a brief cameo in The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951). First onscreen credit for Pat Matthews at Lantz.

1944Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Swing Simphony The Greatest Man in Siam James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
First onscreen credits for Art Heinemann and Phil DeGuard at Lantz. The first appearance of Pat Matthews' shapely dancing girl, referred to as "Miss X" by the model sheets for this cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker The Barber of Seville James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The first appearance of Ben Hardaway as the voice of Woody. The first cartoon to use the famous opening where Woody pops out of a tree stump, animated by Emery Hawkins. The first cartoon to feature a new streamlined version of Woody. He is now cuter and less rough and wild. The last appearance of Woody with green eyes until Musical Moments from Chopin (1947).
Swing Symphony Jungle Jive James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
This cartoon contains the last known recording by pianist, Bob Zurke. He died a month after recording the soundtrack for this cartoon in 1942.
Andy Panda Fish Fry James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Swing Symphony Abou Ben Boogie James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The second and final appearance of "Miss X." Some animation of "Miss X" by Pat Matthews, deemed "too sexy," was cropped out of Castle Films home use prints.
Woody Woodpecker The Beach Nut James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The first appearance of Woody with blue eyes, the eye color would revert to green in 1947. The first appearance of Wally Walrus. First onscreen credit for Dick Lundy at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Ski for Two James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
First onscreen credit for Grim Natwick at Lantz. First onscreen credit for Don Williams at Lantz since his depature in 1933. This cartoon is perhaps best known for the sequence (animated by Dick Lundy) of Woody skiing and singing the melody The Sleigh (a la Russe) (written in 1926 by Richard Kountz and Ivor Tchervanow). According to the memoirs of director Shamus Culhane, the composition was used in the cartoon with the belief that it was in the public domain. However, near the short's completion, it was discovered that the tune was actually still under copyright. Instead of having the sequence re-edited to a new song, Lantz sent a fifty dollar offer to the publishing firm of The Sleigh for its use in the film. They sent a letter back stating that they would only accept nothing less than a hundred dollars, an amount that Lantz gladly paid.
Andy Panda The Painter and the Pointer James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
This cartoon features a very different design of Andy Panda. Apparently, it failed to gain favor with audiences and was never used again for any subsequent releases. Andy's usual happy-go-lucky personality seems to have changed here as well. By his behavior, the "new Andy" could easily pass as Andy's evil twin brother.

1945Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Swing Simphony The Pied Piper of Basin Street James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The mayor appears to be a caricature of Lou Costello.
Woody Woodpecker Chew-Chew Baby James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Last onscreen credit for Art Heinemann at Lantz.
Swing Symphony Sliphorn King of Polaroo Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The Final Swing Symphony cartoon. Early storyboards show Wally Walrus in the role of Jackson, the Sliphorn King of Polaroo. For whatever reason, Wally was dropped and the character was played by a lion in the finished cartoon. Dick Lundy's directorial debut
Woody Woodpecker Woody Dines Out James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Last onscreen credits for Philip DeGuard and Don Williams at Lantz.
Andy Panda Crow Crazy Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
The first appearance of Andy's dim-witted dog, Milo. He would appear again in Mousie Come Home (1946).
Woody Woodpecker The Dippy Diplomat James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Woody Woodpecker The Loose Nut James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
First onscreen credit for Terry Lind at Lantz. Model sheets for this cartoon refer to the construction worker as "Bull Dozer."

1946Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Musical Miniature The Poet and Peasant Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Features Andy Panda. Academy Award nominee.
Andy Panda Mousie Come Home James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Andy Panda Apple Andy Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Last onscreen credit for Emery Hawkins at Lantz
Woody Woodpecker Who's Cookin' Who? James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Model sheets for this cartoon refer to Woody's wolf nemesis as "Wolfie Wolf"
Woody Woodpecker Bathing Buddies Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Omitted from some circulating copies of this cartoon is the reference to "No Opium Smoking" on Wally's "Rules for Roomers" list.
Woody Woodpecker The Reckless Driver James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Excised from many circulating copies of this cartoon is the scene where Woody spits alphabet soup at Officer Wally. The letters of the soup spell out: "Roses are red. Violets are blue. This test stinks and so do you".
Woody Woodpecker Fair Weather Fiends James Culhane Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Last onscreen credits for James Culhane and Terry Lind at Lantz.
Andy Panda The Wacky Weed Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Jack Cosgriff
First onscreen credits for Jack Cosgriff and Fred Brunish at Lantz.

1947Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Musical Miniature Musical Moments from Chopin Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Features Woody Woodpecker and Andy Panda. The first appearance of Woody with green eyes since The Barber of Seville (1944).
Woody Woodpecker Smoked Hams Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Woody Woodpecker The Coo Coo Bird Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Musical Miniature The Overture To William Tell Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Features Wally Walrus. Includes reused animation from Sliphorn King of Polaroo (1945)
Woody Woodpecker Well Oiled Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and Andy Panda can be seen on a board saying Walter Lantz's New Funnies Magazine in one part of the cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Solid Ivory Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Milt Schaffer
Last onscreen credits for Grim Natwick and Milt Schaffer at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Woody the Giant Killer Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Webb Smith
The final Walter Lantz cartoon to be released by Universal Studios until Puny Express (1951). First onscreen credits for Ed Love and Webb Smith. The first appearance of salesman Buck Beaver. His second, and last, animated appearance was in Scrappy Birthday (1949) with Andy Panda.
Musical Miniature The Band Master Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Webb Smith
The first Walter Lantz cartoon to be released by United Artists. Features Andy Panda. The original production number for this short was F-13. However, F-13 was later reassigned to Woody the Giant Killer.

1948Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker The Mad Hatter Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Webb Smith
First onscreen credits for Ken O'Brien and Fred Moore at Lantz. Prior to securing a contract with United Artists, the original production number of this short was G-1.
Woody Woodpecker Banquet Busters Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Webb Smith
Features Andy Panda. Last onscreen credit for Webb Smith at Lantz.
Musical Miniature Kiddie Koncert Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Jack Cosgriff
Features Wally Walrus.
Woody Woodpecker Wacky-Bye Baby Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Jack Cosgriff
Musical Miniature Pixie Picnic Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Jack Cosgriff
The Final Musical Miniature. Last onscreen credit for Fred Moore at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Wet Blanket Policy Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
The first appearance of Buzz Buzzard. First onscreen credit for Heck Allen at Lantz. The first cartoon to feature The Woody Woodpecker Song. The Woody Woodpecker Song became a huge hit in June 1948 (selling over 250,000 records within ten days of release). In response to the tune's popularity, Lantz rushed the song into this cartoon (which was released in August 1948). This explains why the action and music don't really match up for the first minute or so into the film. The Woody Woodpecker Song was originally recorded by Kay Kyser and his Orchestra. The vocals were provided by Gloria Wood and Harry Babbit, who also provide the vocals for the version heard in this cartoon. This cartoon has the honor of being the only cartoon short ever to be nominated for an Oscar for "Best Song" (for The Woody Woodpecker Song).
Andy Panda Playful Pelican Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Jack Cosgriff
Last onscreen credits for Jack Cosgriff and Ken O'Brien at Lantz.
Andy Panda Dog Tax Dodgers Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
Woody Woodpecker Wild and Woody! Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
Last onscreen credit for Pat Matthews at Lantz. Hairy James is a spoof of Harry James, the popular swing trumpeter and bandleader.

1949Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Andy Panda Scrappy Birthday Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
The final Andy Panda cartoon, Andy Panda would later have a cameo appearance in The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951) and appeared in the special episode for The Woody Woodpecker Show known as Spook-A-Nanny (1965). The only official appearance of Miranda Panda though she would have a cameo appearance in The Woody Woodpecker Polka.
Woody Woodpecker Drooler's Delight Dick Lundy Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
Last onscreen credits for Dick Lundy and Ed Love at Lantz. The final musical score by Darrell Calker. Clarence Wheeler would take over starting in 1951. The final Walter Lantz cartoon released through United Artists. The last time Ben Hardaway would provide the voice for Woody. Grace Stafford would begin to voice Woody regularly in 1953 (while providing his laugh in 1951-52 releases).

1951Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Puny Express Walter Lantz (uncredited)
Dick Lundy (uncredited)
Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
First onscreen credit for Don Patterson at Lantz. The first musical score by Clarence Wheeler. The first Walter Lantz cartoon to be released through Universal Studios since 1947. Grace Stafford, Lantz's wife and the future permanent voice of the woodpecker, provides Woody's trademark laugh for the first time in this cartoon. It can be heard at the beginning and end. Oddly, the original Mel Blanc Woody laugh can be heard at one point during the short as well. When his studio reopened, Lantz felt that Woody ought to be streamlined again. Woody's top knot would now be pushed forward, his beak would curve up slighly, and he would also became shorter. Lantz felt that Woody's size played an important role in the films, as he observed that audiences were more inclined to empathize with the "little guy" over the "big bully."
Woody Woodpecker Sleep Happy Walter Lantz (uncredited)
Dick Lundy (uncredited)
Ben Hardaway
Heck Allen
Last onscreen credits for Ben Hardaway and Heck Allen at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Wicket Wacky Walter Lantz (uncredited) Fred Brunish (uncredited) First onscreen credit for Ray Abrams since his depature in 1937. The gopher in this cartoon was identified on model sheets as "Goofy Gopher." He is identified onscreen as "J. Goofer Gopher." In one scene, the gopher speaks to Woody in what many identify at first as gibberish. However, when slowed down, one can hear a man saying random phrases such as "Cohen is trying to call off the manager of a certain bank, who happens to be his landlord" or "Hello? What? What number do I want? Well, what numbers have ya got?" Later in the short, Woody confronts the gibberish-speaking gopher for a second time. Again, when slowed down we hear a man speaking a few more choice phrases including "Are you the bank?" or "This is not a telescope? It's a telephone?" The speaker is actually early 20th century comedian Joe Hayman performing the Cohen on the Telephone monologue. It was recorded in London in 1913 and is believed to be the first comedy monologue to sell a million copies.
Woody Woodpecker Slingshot 6 7/8 Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ray Patin (uncredited)
Riley Thomson (uncredited)
As Woody first comes into the Western town, look for "Ray Abrams' Gun Shop", "Patterson's Mining Supplies", and "Ken's Coffee and Do-Nuts" (probably refers to animator Ken Southworth) in the background.
Woody Woodpecker The Redwood Sap Walter Lantz (uncredited) Fred Brunish (uncredited)
Don Towsley (uncredited)
Woody Woodpecker The Woody Woodpecker Polka Walter Lantz (uncredited) Don Towsley (uncredited) The lyrics of the song The Woody Woodpecker Polka were written by Warren Foster and Tedd Pierce (music by Billy May). Andy Panda, Miranda Panda, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, and Charlie Chicken would all have a cameo appearance in this short, this would also be their final appearances, though Andy Panda would appear one more time in the special cartoon of The Woody Woodpecker Show called Spook-A-Nanny (1965).
Woody Woodpecker Destination Meatball Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway (uncredited)
Heck Allen (uncredited)
This cartoon's title is a play on the 1950 George Pal feature Destination Moon, which also featured Woody Woodpecker. Cartoon wrongly wroten as 1952 in Copyright Years

1952Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Born to Peck Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway (uncredited)
Heck Allen (uncredited)
Don Towsley (uncredited)
Woody Woodpecker Stage Hoax Walter Lantz (uncredited) Fred Brunish (uncredited)
Don Towsley (uncredited)
This cartoon marks the first time Grace Stafford provided extensive dialouge for Woody (in all previous cartoons, she merely provided his laugh). However, it should be noted that she is doing the voice of Woody dressed as a woman, not Woody's "normal" voice.
Woody Woodpecker Woodpecker in the Rough Walter Lantz (uncredited) Ben Hardaway (uncredited)
Heck Allen (uncredited)
Don Towsley (uncredited)
Grace Stafford provides dialogue as Woody in Woody's normal voice for the first time in this cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Scalp Treatment Walter Lantz (uncredited) Don Towsley (uncredited) Walter Lantz's final single effort as a director, he would director one more cartoon in 1953 with Paul J. Smith.
Woody Woodpecker The Great Who-Dood-It Don Patterson Homer Brightman Don Patterson's directorial debut. First onscreen credit for Homer Brightman.
Woody Woodpecker Termites From Mars Don Patterson Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
In 1953, this cartoon's plot was adapted for a promotional giveaway comic book for Scotch Tape called Woody Woodpecker Meets Scotty MacTape.

1953Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker What's Sweepin' Don Patterson Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
Most copies of this cartoon are missing the final scene of Wally catching Woody, and Woody being forced to sweep up after the elephants.
N/A The Dog That Cried Wolf Paul J. Smith
Walter Lantz (uncredited)
Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
The first cartoon to be directed by Paul J. Smith who would direct cartoons for the Lantz studio until it's final shutdown in 1972. The final cartoon to be directed by Walter Lantz. The first non-Woody Woodpecker cartoon produced by the Lantz studio since the return to Universal. First onscreen credits for Gil Turner and Robert Bentley at Lantz. First onscreen Cecil Surry at Lantz since his depature in 1935. It should to be noted that Surry was moonlighting at Lantz while also working for United Productions of America (UPA).
Woody Woodpecker Buccaneer Woodpecker Don Patterson Homer Brightman First onscreen credit for Art Landy at Lantz.
Foolish Fable The Mouse and the Lion Paul J. Smith Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
The first Foolish Fable cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Operation Sawdust Don Patterson Homer Brightman Snipped from most copies of this cartoon is the scene where the runaway saw blade slices Buzz in half.
Foolish Fable The Flying Turtle Paul J. Smith Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
The final Foolish Fable cartoon. Last onscreen credit for Cecil Surry at Lantz
Woody Woodpecker Wrestling Wrecks Don Patterson Eric Gurney (uncredited)
Milt Schaffer (uncredited)
The first appearance of Elmer the Great Dane since Soup to Mutts (1939), he would make one more appearance in the special cartoon of the The Woody Woodpecker Show known as, Spook-A-Nanny (1965). First onscreen credit for Ken Southworth at Lantz.
Maw & Paw Maw and Paw Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first Maw & Paw cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Belle Boys Don Patterson Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Hypnotic Hick Don Patterson Homer Brightman The only Lantz cartoon to be released in 3-D. This is also the first Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme
Maw & Paw Plywood Panic Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman It is likely that this cartoon was originally intended to be released in 3-D.
Woody Woodpecker Hot Noon (or 12 O'Clock For Sure) Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman This cartoon is an obvious satire of the 1952 United Artists feature High Noon starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly.
Chilly Willy Chilly Willy Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first appearance of Chilly Willy and the first cartoon in the Chilly Willy series.

1954Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Socko in Morocco Don Patterson Homer Brightman
Sugarfoot A Horse's Tale Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese The first Sugarfoot cartoon. First onscreen credit for Michael Maltese at Lantz. Sugarfoot the Horse appeared in only two solo cartoons, before he became a supporting character in later Woody Woodpecker cartoons. The second and final short in the Sugarfoot solo series was Hay Rube (also released in 1954).
Woody Woodpecker Alley to Bali Don Patterson Homer Brightman
N/A Dig That Dog Ray Patterson
Grant Simmons
Ray Patterson
Grant Simmons
Even though Cuddles the Great Dane was only featured in this one cartoon, he appeared on merchandise including drinking glasses and coloring books. Lantz, a great dane owner himself, was probably fond of this cartoon and the character. Dig That Dog and Broadway Bow Wow's were made independently by the Grantray studio. Grantray (Lawrence) was of course Grant Simmons and Ray Patterson's post-MGM studio. Lantz gave them the go-ahead to write and direct several theatrical cartoons for him. There was no need for them to hire their own music director or background people since Lantz people needed the work. Walter Lantz went so far as to have have a complete budget worked out for every facet of these two cartoons, but was shrewd enough to be sure he obtained ownership of them outright.
Woody Woodpecker Under the Counter Spy Don Patterson Homer Brightman This cartoon spoofs the popular 1951-59 television series Dragnet which was also made into a 1954 feature.
Sugarfoot Hay Rube Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese The final Sugarfoot cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Hot Rod Huckster Don Patterson Homer Brightman
N/A Broadway Bow Wow's Ray Patterson
Grant Simmons
Ray Patterson
Grant Simmons
As John and Mary's name quickly moves up to the top of the marquee it shows the names, "Mophisto the Magician", "The Duo Trio", "Chinese Jugglers", "Trained Seals", "Omalet in Hamlet", "Tightrope Walkers", "'Gulpo' the Sword Swallower", "Tiny the Elephant", "Snake Hips 'Suzzy'", "Pierre's Puppets", "Seedy's Bird Act", "Max and His Sax", and "The Gilhooley Girls".
Maw & Paw Pig in a Pickle Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese
Woody Woodpecker Real Gone Woody Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese The first and only animated appearance by Woody's girlfriend, Winnie Woodpecker (excluding the later New Woody Woodpecker Show).
Woody Woodpecker A Fine Feathered Frenzy Don Patterson Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Convict Concerto Don Patterson (uncredited) Hugh Harmon
Chilly Willy I'm Cold Tex Avery Homer Brightman The first appearance of Smedley. First onscreen credit Tex Avery since his depature in 1935. I'm Cold was the first of four shorts that Avery directed for Lantz in 1954-55.

1955Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Helter Shelter Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese
N/A Crazy Mixed Up Pup Tex Avery Tex Avery Academy Award nominee.
Woody Woodpecker Witch Crafty Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Michael Maltese
Chilly Willy The Legend of Rockabye Point Tex Avery Michael Maltese Acadmey Award nominee.
Woody Woodpecker Private Eye Pooch Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Michael Maltese
The first appearance of Professor Dingledong.
N/A Sh-h-h-h-h-h Tex Avery Tex Avery Last onscreen credit for Tex Avery at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Bedtime Bedlam Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman June Foray provides the voice of Mrs. Moneybelt in this cartoon.
N/A Flea for Two Don Patterson Michael Maltese
Maw & Paw Paw's Night Out Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Michael Maltese
The final Maw & Paw cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Square Shootin' Square Paul J. Smith Michael Maltese First onscreen credit for Dal McKennon at Lantz. The first appearance of Dapper Denver Dooley.
Chilly Willy Hot and Cold Penguin Alex Lovy Alex Lovy First onscreen credit for Alex Lovy since his departure in 1943. Originally storyboarded by Tex Avery.
Woody Woodpecker Bunco Busters Paul J. Smith Milt Schaffer First onscreen credit for Milt Schaffer at Lantz since his departure in 1947. The final cartoon to feature Woody with green eyes. The final appearance of Buzz Buzzard until Tumble Weed Greed (1969).
Woody Woodpecker The Tree Medic Alex Lovy Homer Brightman The first cartoon to feature Woody with black eyes. Alex Lovy's return at directing a Woody Woodpecker cartoon since 1943's The Dizzy Acrobat.

1956Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
N/A Pigeon Holed Alex Lovy Homer Brightman Pigeon Holed marks the first appearance of Homer Pigeon (now redesigned) since 1943. It was also his final cartoon. In one scene, Homer's two friends are identified as "Alex" and "Paul". They were probably named after directors Alex Lovy and Paul J. Smith.
Woody Woodpecker After the Ball Paul J. Smith Jack Cosgriff First onscreen credit for Daws Butler at Lantz. First onscreen credit for Jack Cosgriff at Lantz since his departure in 1948.
Woody Woodpecker Get Lost Paul J. Smith Jack Cosgriff The first animated appearance of Splinter & Knothead. First cartoon to use this Walter Lantz logo. Last onscreen credit for Gil Turner at Lantz. The first animated appearance of Splinter and Knothead
Maggie & Sam The Ostrich Egg and I Alex Lovy Homer Brightman First onscreen credit for Grace Stafford at Lantz. The first musical score by Eugene Poddany The first Maggie & Sam cartoon. Since the two characters were so successful in Crazy Mixed Up Pup (1955), Alex Lovy decided to cast them in their own short-lived series. This cartoon's title is a play on the 1947 Universal feature The Egg and I starring Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray.
Woody Woodpecker Chief Charlie Horse Paul J. Smith Jack Cosgriff Last onscreen credit for Jack Cosgriff at Lantz.
Chilly Willy Room and Wrath Alex Lovy Homer Brightman Originally storyboarded by Tex Avery.
Woody Woodpecker Woodpecker From Mars Paul J. Smith
Don Patterson
Homer Brightman Includes reused animation from Termites From Mars (1952) "Captain Zoom" is actually a caricature of Dal McKennon. "Zoom" was based on a character called "Captain Jet" who McKennon played on a local Los Angeles television station at the time.
Chilly Willy Hold That Rock Alex Lovy Homer Brightman Originally storyboarded by Tex Avery.
Maggie & Sam The Talking Dog Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Calling All Cuckoos Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Niagara Fools Paul J. Smith Milt Schaffer
Dick Kinney
This cartoon uses a different opening theme. First onscreen credit for Dick Kinney at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Arts and Flowers Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Frank J. Goldberg
This cartoon uses a different opening theme
Woody Woodpecker Woody Meets Davy Crewcut Alex Lovy Homer Brightman

1957Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Maggie & Sam Fowled Up Party Alex Lovy Homer Brightman The final Maggie & Sam cartoon. The theme music previously heard at the beginning of the Maw and Paw cartoons is heard over the titles.
Woody Woodpecker Red Riding Hoodlum Paul J. Smith Milt Schaffer
Dick Kinney
Wolfie Wolf, previously seen in Who's Cookin' Who? and Fair Weather Fiends (both 1946) returns in this cartoon. Smokey the bear also makes a brief cameo in this cartoon.
Hercules Plumber of Seville Alex Lovy Dick Kinney The first Hercules cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Box Car Bandit Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman Includes reused animation from Square Shootin' Square (1955). This cartoon uses a different opening theme.
Chilly Willy Operation Cold Feet Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker The Unbearable Salesman Paul J. Smith Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker International Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Dick Kinney Winnie Woodpecker makes a cameo as the caveman woodpecker's girlfriend and as Fifi from Paris.
Woody Woodpecker To Catch a Woodpecker Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Hercules The Goofy Gardener Alex Lovy Dick Kinney The final Hercules cartoon.
Chilly Willy The Big Snooze Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Round Trip to Mars Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker Dopey Dick the Pink Whale Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman This cartoon is a loose satire of the 1956 Warner Bros. feature Moby Dick starring Gregory Peck.
Woody Woodpecker Fodder and Son Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first appearance of the bears Windy & Breezy.
Chilly Willy Swiss Miss-Fit Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
N/A The Bongo Punch Alex Lovy Dick Kinney The first and only appearance of Pepito Chickeeto. A headline on one of the newspapers reads "LANTZ TV SHOW -IG SMASH!!" This refers to the ratings success of The Woody Woodpecker Show which debuted on ABC in October, 1957.


1958Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Misguided Missile Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first cartoon where Grace Stafford receives credit for doing Woody's voice.
Woody Woodpecker Watch the Birdie Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Windy & Breezy Salmon Yeggs Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first cartoon in the Windy and Breezy series. The first appearance of the character who later developed into Inspector Willoughby.
Woody Woodpecker Half Empty Saddles Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Chilly Willy Polar Pests Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy A Chilly Reception Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker His Better Elf Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Everglade Raid Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman An unproduced Woody Woodpecker short entitled Trail Blazin' Rangers was originally slated to be production U-89. While storyboards were made, the cartoon itself was never produced for reasons that are not entirely clear. This cartoon features a prototype of Gabby Gator, named "Ali Gator." The character would not be officially billed "Gabby" until Southern Fried Hospitality (1960).
Woody Woodpecker Tree’s a Crowd Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Windy & Breezy Three Ring Fling Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Jittery Jester Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Little Televillain Alex Lovy Homer Brightman


1959Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Windy & Breezy Truant Student Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Robinson Gruesome Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Tomcat Combat Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Yukon Have It Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Log Jammed Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Panhandle Scandal Alex Lovy Dalton Sandifer
Windy & Breezy Bee Bopped Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The final Windy & Breezy cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Woodpecker in the Moon Alex Lovy Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker The Tee Bird Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Romp in a Swamp Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The Gabby Gator prototype "Ali Gator" is featured again in this cartoon. This time, he looks pretty much the same as Gabby, but would not be officially called "Gabby" until Southern Fried Hospitality (1960).
Hickory, Dickory, and Doc Space Mouse Alex Lovy Homer Brightman (uncredited) The first appearances of Hickory, Dickory, and Doc and the first in the Hickory, Dickory, and Doc series. Doc would eventually star in a series of his own solo cartoons. An early concept sketch dated August 11, 1958 (courtesy of Monte and Taylor Robison) features a scruffier (and more sinister) version of Doc. Meanwhile, Hickory, a character who would be eventually developed into a female mouse, is shown here as a dim-witted male in blue overalls. It is possible that the Lantz studio opted not to use the dumb-smart formula for Hickory and Dickory due to similiarities with Chuck Jones' mouse pair Hubie and Bertie from Warner Bros. Despite the title of this cartoon it does not feature the Lantz comic book character, Space Mouse.
Woody Woodpecker Kiddie League Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer Last onscreen credit for Robert Bentley at Lantz. There are some hidden gaggs, such as one of the little leaguers, briefly seen at the beginning of the cartoon, on the 'Bubble Gummers' team resembles MAD Magazine mascot, Alfred E. Newman. On one of the advertisements in the ball park, the name "Paul's" can be seen (probably a reference to director, Paul J. Smith). "Joe's Cafe and Catering" can also be seen, that one is most likely a variation of the old "Eat at Joe's" gag.
Hickory, Dickory, and Doc Mouse Trapped Alex Lovy Homer Brightman


1960Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Billion Dollar Boner Alex Lovy Homer Brightman
Hickory, Dickory, and Doc Witty Kitty Alex Lovy Homer Brightman The final Hickory, Dickory, and Doc cartoon. Doc would now appear in his own series.
Woody Woodpecker Pistol Packin' Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker Heap Big Hepcat Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer This cartoon was wrongly wroten as 1959 in Copyright Years.
Woody Woodpecker Ballyhooey Alex Lovy Homer Brightman Last Woody Woodpecker cartoon to be directed by Alex Lovy.
Woody Woodpecker How to Stuff a Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker Bats in the Belfry Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Ozark Lark Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Fish Hooked Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Doc Freeloading Feline Jack Hannah Jack Hannah The first appearance of Champ.
Fatso the Bear Hunger Strife Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer First appearance of Fatso the Bear and the first cartoon in the Fatso the Bear series. Fatso the Bear and Ranger Willoughby are nearly identical in appearance and personality to Humphrey the Bear and Ranger Woodlore, characters Jack Hannah created at the Walt Disney Studio.
Woody Woodpecker Southern Fried Hospitality Jack Hannah Homer Brightman First official appearance of Gabby Gator. Similar alligators appeared in Romp in a Swamp (1958) and Everglade Raid (1959). First Woody Woodpecker to be directed by Jack Hannah
Woody Woodpecker Fowled Up Falcon Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman

1961Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Inspector Willoughby Rough and Tumbleweed Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first cartoon where the Willoughby character becomes known as Inspector Willoughby. The first cartoon in the Inspector Willoughby series.
Woody Woodpecker Poop Deck Pirate Jack Hannah Homer Brightman
Fatso the Bear Eggnapper Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker The Bird Who Came to Dinner Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Gabby's Diner Jack Hannah Homer Brightman
N/A Papoose on the Loose Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Clash and Carry Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy St. Moritz Blitz Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Fatso The Bear Bear and the Bees Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer The final Fatso The Bear cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Sufferin' Cats Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Inspector Willoughby Mississippi Slow Boat Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The narrator introduces the Inspector by his full name: Inspector Seward Willoughby. At the time, the Lantz Studio was located at 861 Seward Street in Hollywood, California (and, we should note, that a Willoughby Ave. crosses Seward Street at that corner).
Woody Woodpecker Franken-Stymied Jack Hannah Homer Brightman Last Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme.
Woody Woodpecker Busman's Holiday Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer This was the first cartoon to use the another Woody Woodpecker theme.
Chilly Willy Tricky Trout Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer The final appearance of Wally Walrus.
Woody Woodpecker Phantom of the Horse Opera Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Doc Tin Can Concert (Presents The Cinderella Overture by Rossini) Jack Hannah Jack Hannah
Doc Doc's Last Stand Jack Hannah Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker Woody's Kook-Out Jack Hannah Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Inspector Willoughby Case of the Red-Eyed Ruby Paul J. Smith Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch

1962Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Home Sweet Homewrecker Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Woody Woodpecker Rock-a-Bye Gator Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer Last Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme.
Doc Pest of Show Jack Hannah Frank Priest
Woody Woodpecker Room and Bored Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
First Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme.
Chilly Willy Mackerel Moocher Jack Hannah Bill Danch
The Beary Family Fowled-Up Birthday Jack Hannah Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
The first appearance of The Beary Family and the first cartoon in the Beary Family series. The Beary Family's pet, Goose Beary, would eventually be dropped from the series after the first few shorts.
Woody Woodpecker Rocket Racket Jack Hannah Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Inspector Willoughby Phoney Express Paul J. Smith Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Woody Woodpecker Careless Caretaker Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
The Beary Family Mother's Little Helper Jack Hannah Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker Tragic Magic Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Inspector Willoughby Hyde and Sneak Paul J. Smith Bill Danch Woody Woodpecker makes a partial cameo in this cartoon. The villain in this cartoon bares an uncanny resemblance to Natasha Fatale of Jay Ward's Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.
Woody Woodpecker Voo-Doo Boo-Boo Jack Hannah Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Woody Woodpecker Crowin' Pains Paul J. Smith Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Last Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme.
Doc Punchy Pooch Jack Hannah Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Little Woody Riding Hood Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer First Woody Woodpecker cartoon to use this opening theme, used until last cartoon Bye, Bye, Blackboard (1972)
Doc Corny Concerto Jack Hannah Dave Detiege The final Doc cartoon.


1963Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Chilly Willy Fish & Chips Jack Hannah Dalton Sandifer Last onscreen credit for Jack Hannah at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Greedy Gabby Gator Sid Marcus Milt Schaffer
Inspector Willoughby Coming Out Party Paul J. Smith Dave Detiege
Inspector Willoughby Case of the Cold Storage Yegg Paul J. Smith Tedd Pierce
Bill Danch
Woody Woodpecker Robin Hoody Woody Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
The Beary Family Charlie's Mother-in-Law Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
As Charlie rolls down the street inside the piano, he almost collides with a "Kline's Food" truck (a reference to animator Les Kline).
Woody Woodpecker Stowaway Woody Sid Marcus Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Inspector Willoughby Hi-Seas Hi-Jacker Paul J. Smith Dave Detiege
Woody Woodpecker Shutter Bug Paul J. Smith Dave Detiege
Chilly Willy Salmon Loafer Sid Marcus Ralph Wright
Woody Woodpecker Coy Decoy Sid Marcus Dalton Sandifer
The Beary Family Goose in the Rough Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker The Tenant's Racket Sid Marcus Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker Short in the Saddle Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Pesky Pelican Sid Marcus Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Woody Woodpecker Tepee for Two Sid Marcus Bob Ogle
The Beary Family Goose is Wild Paul J. Smith Al Bertino
Dick Kinney
Last onscreen credit for Dick Kinney at Lantz. The final appearance of Goosy Beary.
Woody Woodpecker Science Friction Sid Marcus Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Calling Dr. Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The first appearance of Miss Meaney.


1964Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Dumb Like a Fox Sid Marcus Homer Brightman The first appearance of Fink Fox.
Inspector Willoughby The Case of the Maltese Chicken Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Deep Freeze Squeeze Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Saddle-Sore Woody Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Woody's Clip Joint Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
The Beary Family Rah-Rah Ruckus Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Skinfolks Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Lighthouse Keeping Blues Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Get Lost! Little Doggy Sid Marcus Cal Howard Walter Lantz provides the voice of the man looking at Duffy at the beginning of the cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Freeway Fracas Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
The Beary Family Rooftop Razzle Dazzle Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Ski-Napper Sid Marcus Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Roamin' Roman Paul J. Smith Cal Howard

1965Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Three Little Woodpeckers Sid Marcus Cal Howard Walter Lantz considered this his personal favorite cartoon.
Inspector Willoughby The Case of the Elephant's Trunk Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The final Inspector Willoughby cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Woodpecker Wanted Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Chilly Willy Fractured Friendship Sid Marcus Cal Howard Woody Woodpecker makes a small cameo in this cartoon
The Beary Family Guest Who? Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Birds of a Feather Sid Marcus Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Half Baked Alaska Sid Marcus Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Canned Dog Feud Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
The Beary Family Davey Cricket Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The final appearance of Suzy Beary.
Woody Woodpecker Janie Get Your Gun Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Pesty Guest Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Sioux Me Sid Marcus Home Brightman The first and final "official" appearance of Fink Fox, who debuted in Dumb Like a Fox (1964).
Woody Woodpecker What's Peckin' Paul J. Smith Cal Howard

1966Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Rough Riding Hood Sid Marcus Cal Howard
The Beary Family Foot Brawl Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Lonesome Ranger Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Snow Place Like Home Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Woody and the Beanstalk Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy South Pole Pals Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Hassle in a Castle Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Polar Fright Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The first appearance of Maxie the Polar Bear.
Woody Woodpecker The Big Bite Paul J. Smith Cal Howard Last onscreen credit for Art Landy at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Astronut Woody Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Teeny Weeny Meany Sid Marcus Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Practical Yolk Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Monster of Ceremonies Paul J. Smith Cal Howard

1967Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Chilly Willy Operation Shanghai Sid Marcus Homer Brightman Sid Marcus' last directorial effort at Lantz. All cartoons afterward would be directed by Paul J. Smith.
The Beary Family Window Pains Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Sissy Sheriff Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Vicious Viking Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Have Gun, Can't Travel Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker The Nautical Nut Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Chilly Willy Hot Time on Ice Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Woody Woodpecker Hot Diggity Dog Paul J. Smith Cal Howard Duffy Dog, from Get Lost! Little Doggy (1964), returns.
The Beary Family Mouse in the House Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Horse Play Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Chilly and the Woodchopper Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Woody Woodpecker Secret Agent Woody Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Chilly Chums Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman Woody Woodpecker makes a small cameo in this cartoon.

1968Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Lotsa Luck Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Under Sea Dogs Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
The Beary Family Jerky Turkey Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Fat in the Saddle Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Feudin Fightin-N-Fussin Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Paste Makes Waste Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Peck of Trouble Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker A Lad in Bagdad Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Highway Hecklers Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman Although Grace Stafford is credited with providing Woody's voice, Woody himself does not appear at all in this cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker One Horse Town Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Bugged in a Rug Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Chiller Dillers Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Woody the Freeloader Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman Final credit for Ray Huffine at Lantz.

1969Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Woody Woodpecker Hook Line and Stinker Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Gopher Broke Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Little Skeeter Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Chilly Willy Project Reject Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Woody's Knight Mare Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Charlie's Campout Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Tumble Weed Greed Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman First appearance of Buzz Buzzard since Bunco Busters (1955), he would appear a few more times afterwards up until The Genie with the Light Touch (1972).
Chilly Willy Chilly and the Looney Gooney Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman The first appearance of the Looney Gooney Bird.
Woody Woodpecker Ship A'hoy Woody Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
Woody Woodpecker Prehistoric Super Salesman Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman
The Beary Family Cool It Charlie Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Phoney Pony Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Chilly Willy Sleepy Time Bear Paul J. Smith Homer Brightman

1970Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
The Beary Family Charlie in Hot Water Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Seal on the Loose Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Gooney's Goofy Landings Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
Woody Woodpecker Wild Bill Hiccup Paul J. Smith Don Christensen
The Beary Family Charlie's Golf Classic Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Chilly Willy Chilly's Ice Folly Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
Woody Woodpecker Coo Coo Nuts Paul J. Smith Don Christensen
Woody Woodpecker Hi-Rise Wise Guys Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
The Beary Family The Unhandy Man Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Buster's Last Stand Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
Chilly Willy Chilly's Cold War Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Woody Woodpecker All Hams on Deck Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Woody Woodpecker Flim Flam Fountain Paul J. Smith Don Christensen

1971Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Chilly Willy A Gooney is Born Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus
Woody Woodpecker Sleepy Time Chimes Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
Woody Woodpecker The Reluctant Recruit Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
The Beary Family Charlie the Rainmaker Paul J. Smith Cal Howard On some Beary cartoons, Grace Stafford's credit reads "Woody's Voice."
Woody Woodpecker How to Trap a Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
Chilly Willy Airlift A La Carte Paul J. Smith Dale Hale The only time Maxie, Gooney, and Smedley all appear together in the same cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker Woody's Magic Touch Paul J. Smith Dale Hale
The Beary Family The Bungling Builder Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Kitty from The City Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
Chilly Willy Chilly's Hide-A-Way Paul J. Smith
Sid Marcus
Sid Marcus Includes reused animation from Pesty Guest (1965).
Woody Woodpecker The Snoozin' Bruin Paul J. Smith Dalton Sandifer
The Beary Family Moochin Pooch Paul J. Smith Cal Howard Cuddles the Great Dane from Dig That Dog (1954) appears in this short.
Woody Woodpecker Shanghai Woody Paul J. Smith Cal Howard

1972Edit

Series Film Director Writer Notes
Chilly Willy The Rude Intruder Paul J. Smith Sid Marcus The final theatrical Chilly Willy cartoon. Last onscreen credit for Sid Marcus at Lantz.
Woody Woodpecker Indian Corn Paul J. Smith Tony Benedict
The Beary Family Let Charlie Do It Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Gold Diggin' Woodpecker Paul J. Smith Tony Benedict
The Beary Family A Fish Story Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Pecking Holes in Poles Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Rain, Rain, Go Away Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Chili Con Corny Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
Woody Woodpecker Show Biz Beagle Paul J. Smith Cal Howard
The Beary Family Unlucky Potluck Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The Final Beary Family cartoon.
Woody Woodpecker The Genie with the Light Touch Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The final appearance of Buzz Buzzard.
Woody Woodpecker Bye, Bye, Blackboard Paul J. Smith Cal Howard The final theatrical Woody Woodpecker cartoon. The last theatrical cartoon released by Walter Lantz Productions. The Lantz studio remained independent (having full ownership to the Lantz characters and licensing rights) until Walter Lantz sold everything outright to MCA/Universal in 1984. Walter remained active in overseeing how Universal handled his characters (for merchandise, TV, home video, theme parks, limited edition cels, etc) up until his death in 1994.

Miscellanous ShortsEdit

The following is a list of miscellaneous works produced by or related to Walter Lantz and the Walter Lantz studio. These include Lantz's earliest works at the Bray Studios, unreleased cartoons, films produced for the government, made-for-TV shorts, and other odds and ends.

Coca-Cola AdvertismentsEdit

In 1948, Walter Lantz was approached by the Coca-Cola Company to produce animated theatrical advertisements for their popular soft drink. Lantz agreed and produced twelve of them. Released throughout 1949, they run about one to two minutes each. Unfortunately, the Lantz studio closed and production of these films ceased. After the studio reopened in 1950, the Coca-Cola Company again approached Lantz and eight more theatrical advertisements were produced and released in 1953, again running about one to two minutes each. Today all of these shorts are in the public domain.

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